Kathleen Long

Kathleen Long

Professor of French

kpl2@cornell.edukpl2 Office: KLR K270; Uris 391 Phone: email only

Kathleen Long is Professor of French in the Department of Romance Studies.  Her research focuses on concepts of gender, particularly transgender and intersex, in the early modern world, on early modern representations of the monstrous, and on religious violence.  Her publications include:  High Anxiety: Masculinity in Crisis in Early Modern France (2002); Hermaphrodites in Renaissance Europe (2006); and Gender and Scientific Discourse in Early Modern Europe (2010).  She is preparing a translation of the early modern satirical novel, The Island of Hermaphrodites, as well as a book-length study on the connections between early modern discourses of monstrosity and modern discourses of disability.


Recent Courses

  • Religious Violence in French and Francophone Texts
  • Monsters A-X (Aristotle to the X-Files)
  • Imagining History (The Nineteenth Century Reads the Renaissance)
  • Montaigne and Skepticism
  • Gender and Sexuality in Early Modern France
  • Being Bad in the Renaissance

Research Interests

  • Gender and Sexuality in the Early Modern World
  • History and Theory of the Monstrous
  • History of Science/Alchemy
  • Religious Violence

Selected Publications

Books
  • Hermaphrodites in Renaissance Europe  (Ashgate, 2006)
  • Another Reality: Metamorphosis and the Imagination in the Poetry of Ovid, Petrarch, and Ronsard  (Peter Lang, 1990)
Edited Volumes
  • Gender and Scientific Discourse in Early Modern Culture (Ashgate, November 2010)
  • Religious Differences in France  (Truman State University Press, Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies series, 2006)
  • High Anxiety: Masculinity in Crisis in Early Modern France  (Kirsville, MO: Truman State University Press, Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies series, 2002) 238 pp.
Selected Articles
  • “Le Rebis et la politique de l’alchimie,” in L’Hermaphrodite de la Renaissance aux Lumiéres (Paris: Garnier; forthcoming Fall 2012)
  • “Les riviéres, sites de massacres et de mémoire dans Les tragiques,” for a festschrift for Tom Conley, ed. by Bernd Renner and Phillip Usher (forthcoming, Fall 2012)
  • “Nature Abhors Normality: Theories of the Monstrous from Aristotle to the X-files,” in Speaking of Monsters:  A Teratological Anthology, edited by Caroline Picart and John Browing (Palgrave, July 2012).
  • “The Truth is Out There”: Teaching Rabelais in the Context of a Survey Course on Monsters.” Essay in the volume, Approaches to Teaching Rabelais, ed. Todd Reeser and Floyd Gray (MLA, October 2011)
  • “Odd Bodies: Reviewing Corporeal Difference in Early Modern Alchemy.” In Gender and Scientific Discourse in Early Modern Culture (Ashgate, 2010).
  • “Child in the Water:  The Spectacle of Violence in Théodore Agrippa d’Aubigné’s Les Tragiques,” in Representations of Trauma in French and Francophone Literature, Nicole Simek and Zahi Zalloua, eds. (Halifax, Nova Scotia: Dalhousie University Press,  Dalhousie French Studies, Winter 2007).