María Antonia Garcés

Professor of Hispanic Literatures

mg43@cornell.edumg43 Office: MRL 315 Phone: email only

María Antonia Garcés, Professor of Hispanic Studies; Ph.D. in Spanish and Renaissance Studies from the Johns Hopkins University and M.A. in English from Georgetown University. Professor Garcés teaches early modern Spanish Literatures and Colonial Hispanic American Literatures. She specializes in literary theory, as well as in historical and psychoanalytic approaches to literature. Her special field of interest centers on early modern contacts between Islam and Christianity in Spain and the Mediterranean, which has led her to study the frontiers between cultural and religious traditions both in the Spanish Peninsula and the Mare Nostrum. This exploration also encompasses the thresholds between autobiography and fiction in literary texts, such as in Cervantes. At present, Professor Garcés is working on the cultural, economic, and literary exchanges between the Spanish Peninsula and North Africa in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Her archival research in Spain, Sicily, and Italy has recently produced a major project on Algiers under Ottoman rule in the last years of the sixteenth century, An Early Modern Dialogue with Islam: Antonio de Sosa’s Topography of Algiers (1612) (The University of Notre Dame Press, 2011). Funded by a four-year $150,000 Collaborative Research Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), this project (with Professor Diana de Armas Wilson, translator) involves preparing an annotated English translation of three books from Sosa’s monumental work, composed during his captivity in Algiers. This riveting chronicle presents a wide-ranging and live tableau of Algerian society at the end of the sixteenth century.

In 2003, María Antonia Garcés received the Modern Language Association of America’s James Russell Lowell Prize for her book: Cervantes in Algiers: a Captive’s Tale (Vanderbilt UP, 2002).

Film Director Anna Elizabeth Jessen, from Danish Broadcasting Corporation, recently interviewed Professor Garcés both on her book Cervantes in Algiers and her work on the Topography of Algiers, for a documentary titled White Slaves, Muslim Pirates [Hvide Slaver](Copenhagen, 2010).  Co-produced with the University of Copenhagen, Public Norwegian TV, Finnish TV, Icelandic TV, and Czech TV, this documentary is being aired in 2011 in various European countries.

Recent Courses

  • Tales of Love and Lust
  • Early Hispanic Modernities
  • The Mediterranean in the Times of Cervantes
  • Don Quixote
  • Sin, Crime, and Scandal in Early Modern Hispanic Fictions
  • Spanish Golden Age Drama: Text, Theory, and Performance
  • The Cross and the Crescent: Early Modern Spanish Contacts with Islam
  • Maladies of the Soul: Don Quijote and the Modern Novel
  • Trauma and Captivity: Cervantes to García Márquez
  • Literatures of the Conquest
  • Spanish Short Fiction of the Golden Age
  • Fictions of the Picaresque in Spain and America
  • Renaissance Hispanisms

Research Interests

  • Early Modern Iberian literatures and cultures
  • Colonial Hispanic American literatures and cultures
  • Mediterranean Studies
  • New Historicism
  • Cultural Studies

Selected Publications

Books
  • Cervantes and Algiers: a Captive’s Tale (Nashville, TN: Vanderbilt UP, 2002; revised paperback ed., 2005). 349 pp
  • Cervantes en Argel: historia de un cautivo, Madrid: Gredos, 2005. (The author’s own revised and expanded translation of Cervantes in Algiers: a Captive’s Tale, 2002. The Spanish version has been enriched with new archival data and bibliography). 457 pp
Editions
  • An Early Modern Dialogue with Islam: Antonio de Sosa’s Topography of Algiers (1612), Edited with an Introduction by María Antonia Garcés, trans. Diana de Armas Wilson (Notre Dame: The University of Notre Dame Press, 2011). 374 pp
  • El Carnero: 150 años de su publicación. Edited by María Antonia Garcés and María Betty Osorio de Negret. Bogotá: Universidad de los Andes-Siglo del Hombre Editores, forthcoming, 2011
Essays in Book Collections
  • “‘Era un poco voladora’: Juana García y el primer Auto de Fe del Nuevo Reino de Granada (1563).” El Carnero: 150 años de su publicación. Edited by María Antonia Garcés and María Betty Osorio de Negret. Bogotá: Universidad de los Andes-Siglo del Hombre Editores, forthcoming, 2011.
  • “Introduction” to An Early Modern Dialogue with Islam: Antonio de Sosa’s Topography of Algiers (1612). Edited by María Antonia Garcés, Translated by Diana de Armas Wilson (Notre Dame, IN: The University of Notre Dame Press, 2011), 1-78 & 287-304. (a 78-page scholarly Introduction to the Topography of Algiers, which introduces Sosa’s Algerian chronicle for Anglo-American readers, situates this ethnographic masterpiece among early modern Spanish works on the Maghreb, and establishes its connections with early modern cartographic revolution in sixteenth-century Europe)
  • “Grande amigo mío”: Cervantes y los renegados.” U.S.A. Cervantes. 39 cervantistas en Estados Unidos. Ed. Georgina Dopico-Black and Francisco Layna Ranz. Madrid: Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas-Ediciones Polifemo, 2009. 533-580.
  • “Extrañas y deliciosas traducciones: Las crónicas de Indias en Inglaterra (siglos XVI-XVII).” Literaturas, prácticas y críticas y trasformación cultural. JALLA 2006-Bogotá. Ed. Carolina Alzate Cadavid et al. 2 vol. Bogotá: Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, 2008. I: 219-235.
  • “‘Señora de nuestra libertad’: Cuerpos y fronteras en La historia del cautivo (Don Quijote I, 37-41).” Actas Coloquio Internacional “Cervantes y el Quijote” (Oviedo, 27-30/10/2004). Ed. Emilio Martínez Mata. Madrid: Universidad de Oviedo-Arco Libros, 2007. 131-42.
  • “Un ‘tercer espacio’: Moros, moriscos y renegados en el Quijote de 1605.” Don Quijote en las aulas. Ed. Amalia Iriarte Núñez. Bogotá: Universidad de los Andes–Siglo del Hombre Editores, 2006. 123-152.
  • “Staging Captivity: Cervantes’s Barbary Plays.” Approaches to Teaching the Spanish Comedia. Ed. Margaret Greer and Laura Bass. New York: MLA, 2006. 166-173.
  • “The Translator Translated: Inca Garcilaso and the English Imperial Expansion.” In Travel and Translation in the Early Modern Period. Ed. Carmine de Biase. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2006. 203-225.