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ROMS 1102 : FWS: The Craft of Storytelling
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
We tell stories for many reasons: to entertain; to seduce; to complain; to think. This course draws upon the literatures and cultures of the romance languages to explore the role of narrative in our construction and understanding of the world.
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ROMS 1102 : FWS: The Craft of Storytelling
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
We tell stories for many reasons: to entertain; to seduce; to complain; to think. This course draws upon the literatures and cultures of the romance languages to explore the role of narrative in our construction and understanding of the world.
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ROMS 1108 : FWS:Cultural Identities/Cultural Differences
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What is a culture, and how do we know one when we see it?  This course draws upon the histories and texts of French, Spanish, Italian, and/or Portuguese speaking worlds to discuss issues of identity, difference, politics, place, and community.
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ROMS 1108 : FWS:Cultural Identities/Cultural Differences
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What is a culture, and how do we know one when we see it?  This course draws upon the histories and texts of French, Spanish, Italian, and/or Portuguese speaking worlds to discuss issues of identity, difference, politics, place, and community.
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ROMS 1109 : FWS: Image and Imagination
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What kind of information do images - in photography, painting, and/or film - convey?  What kind of impact do they have on the minds and the bodies of their audiences?  This course foregrounds the role of visual culture in the societies where Spanish, French, Portuguese, and/or Italian is spoken, and it asks students to dwell upon how visual material interacts with spoken and written language.
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ROMS 1109 : FWS: Image and Imagination
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What kind of information do images - in photography, painting, and/or film - convey?  What kind of impact do they have on the minds and the bodies of their audiences?  This course foregrounds the role of visual culture in the societies where Spanish, French, Portuguese, and/or Italian is spoken, and it asks students to dwell upon how visual material interacts with spoken and written language.
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ITAL 1110 : Elementary Italian In Rome I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course provides a thorough grounding in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with practice in small groups.
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ROMS 1113 : FWS: Thinking and Thought
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Some of the most important and intriguing thinkers, from the Middle Ages to postmodernity, have done their thinking in the romance languages.  This course explores a body of work that would be called philosophical by some, theoretical by others, and that, beyond these names, struggles to articulate fundamental concepts, problems, discourses, and situations.
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ROMS 1113 : FWS: Thinking and Thought
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Some of the most important and intriguing thinkers, from the Middle Ages to postmodernity, have done their thinking in the romance languages.  This course explores a body of work that would be called philosophical by some, theoretical by others, and that, beyond these names, struggles to articulate fundamental concepts, problems, discourses, and situations.
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ROMS 1114 : FWS: Semiotics
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
What allows us to make assumptions about people based on the way they speak or dress? How can we understand the deeper meaning of a fairy tale or an episode of The Simpsons? What does macaroni and cheese mean, and why is it not on the menu at most upscale Manhattan eateries? This seminar introduces semiotics, the study of signs and the meaning-bearing sign systems they form; sign systems that include not only human language but also literature, painting, sculpture, film, music, dance and also such aspects of popular culture as advertising, fashion, food, and television, to name just a few. The diversity of semiotic systems provides many possibilities for thinking and writing critically about the world we live in.
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ROMS 1114 : FWS: Semiotics
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What allows us to make assumptions about people based on the way they speak or dress? How can we understand the deeper meaning of a fairy tale or an episode of The Simpsons? What does macaroni and cheese mean, and why is it not on the menu at most upscale Manhattan eateries? This seminar introduces semiotics, the study of signs and the meaning-bearing sign systems they form; sign systems that include not only human language but also literature, painting, sculpture, film, music, dance and also such aspects of popular culture as advertising, fashion, food, and television, to name just a few. The diversity of semiotic systems provides many possibilities for thinking and writing critically about the world we live in.
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ROMS 1120 : FWS: Animals in Global Cinema: Human and Nonhuman
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this class, students will learn about animal welfare and conservation through international films. We will discuss wildlife, companion and farm animals in conjunction with human cultures and politics. The course will cover various animal species, e.g. pangolins, dogs and sheep in fiction films, documentaries and animated movies. Students will learn how to compose film reviews, do research and write a research assignment. The class includes guest speakers, a visit to Cornell barn, library and museum. All films are available for streaming through Blackboard for students to watch them in their free time.
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ITAL 1120 : Elementary Italian In Rome II
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This introductory course provides a thorough grounding in all the language skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing, with practice in small groups.
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SPAN 1120 : Elementary Spanish: Review and Continuation
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
While building language proficiency and accuracy through communicative activities, the course encourages students to actively interact with one another. The instructor facilitates communication and provides feedback and language learning strategies that guide students to take responsibility of their own learning and become active participants in the process. The course also introduces students to the many peoples and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, prompting them to make comparisons with their own culture. Additionally, lectures provide students with opportunities to reflect on relevant grammar topics and assist students in developing language learning strategies. Class discussions are conducted entirely in Spanish. After SPAN 1120, students may take SPAN 1230, SPAN 2070, or SPAN 2090 depending on their LPS score at the end of the course.
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POLSH 1131 : Elementary Polish I
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course, students work on their ability to speak, write, read, and understand contemporary Polish. Students will also develop their intercultural competency. The instructor uses communicative language teaching with emphasis on structured input. Students use the textbook and workbook "Hurra! Po polsku 1" supplemented by Polish-English chapter dictionaries. This class covers chapters 0-9. If a student is not sure of his or her language level, he or she can contact the Polish instructor, Ewa Bachminska, at eb583@cornell.edu.
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POLSH 1131 : Elementary Polish I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this course, students work on their ability to speak, write, read, and understand contemporary Polish. Students will also develop their intercultural competency. The instructor uses communicative language teaching with emphasis on structured input. Students use the textbook and workbook "Hurra! Po polsku 1" supplemented by Polish-English chapter dictionaries. This class covers chapters 0-9. If a student is not sure of his or her language level, he or she can contact the Polish instructor, Ewa Bachminska, at eb583@cornell.edu.
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POLSH 1132 : Elementary Polish II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course, students work on their ability to speak, write, read, and understand contemporary Polish. Students will also develop their intercultural competency. The instructor uses communicative language teaching with emphasis on structured input. Students use the textbook and workbook "Hurra! Po polsku 1" supplemented by Polish-English chapter dictionaries. This class covers chapters 10-20. If a student is not sure of his or her language level, he or she can contact the Polish instructor, Ewa Bachminska, at eb583@cornell.edu.
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POLSH 1132 : Elementary Polish II
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this course, students work on their ability to speak, write, read, and understand contemporary Polish. Students will also develop their intercultural competency. The instructor uses communicative language teaching with emphasis on structured input. Students use the textbook and workbook "Hurra! Po polsku 1" supplemented by Polish-English chapter dictionaries. This class covers chapters 10-20. If a student is not sure of his or her language level, he or she can contact the Polish instructor, Ewa Bachminska, at eb583@cornell.edu.
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POLSH 1133 : Intermediate Polish I
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course, students continue working on their ability to speak, write, read, and understand contemporary Polish. Students will also enhance their intercultural competency. The instructor uses communicative language teaching with emphasis on structured input. Students use the textbook and workbook "Hurra! Po polsku 2" supplemented by Polish-English chapter dictionaries. This class covers chapters 1-10. If a student is not sure of his or her language level, he or she can contact the Polish instructor, Ewa Bachminska, at eb583@cornell.edu.
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POLSH 1133 : Intermediate Polish I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this course, students continue working on their ability to speak, write, read, and understand contemporary Polish. Students will also enhance their intercultural competency. The instructor uses communicative language teaching with emphasis on structured input. Students use the textbook and workbook "Hurra! Po polsku 2" supplemented by Polish-English chapter dictionaries. This class covers chapters 1-10. If a student is not sure of his or her language level, he or she can contact the Polish instructor, Ewa Bachminska, at eb583@cornell.edu.
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ITAL 1201 : Italian I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This is an introductory level course desiged for students who have no previous knowledge of Italian.  In this course, students develop all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) in Italian, and are introduced to Italian culture and to current social and political questions.
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ITAL 1202 : Italian II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This is an introductory level course desiged for students who have no previous knowledge of Italian.  In this course, students develop all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) in Italian, and are introduced to Italian culture and to current social and political questions.
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PORT 1210 : Elementary Brazilian Portuguese I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
A full-year introductory course intended for students with no knowledge of Portuguese and with limited or no knowledge of Spanish. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the fundamental communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
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FREN 1210 : Elementary French
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
FREN 1210-FREN 1220 is a two-semester sequence.  FREN 1210 is the first half of the sequence designed to provide a thorough grounding in French language and an introduction to intercultural competence.  French is used in contextualized, meaningful activities to provide practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing.  Development of analytical skills for grammar leads students toward greater autonomy as language learners.  Students develop their writing skills by writing and editing compositions.  Readings are varied and include literary texts.  Daily preparation and active participation are required.
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SPAN 1210 : Elementary Spanish I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
While building language proficiency and accuracy through communicative activities, the course encourages students to actively interact with one another. The instructor facilitates communication and provides feedback and language learning strategies that guide students to take responsibility of their own learning and become active participants in the process. The course also introduces students to the many peoples and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, prompting them to make comparisons with their own culture. Additionally, lectures provide students with opportunities to reflect on relevant grammar topics and assist students in developing language learning strategies. Class discussions are conducted entirely in Spanish. After 1210 students may take SPAN 1120 (fall) or SPAN 1220 (spring).
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ITAL 1212 : Italian Food Culture
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The aim of this course is to help students familiarize themselves with one of the most important, and world-renowned aspects of Italian culture, or rather "La Cucina Italiana". This course will combine different language learning approaches like grammar and audio/oral activities such as video clips, role play activities in class, interviews regarding food topics, etc., as well as some "hand-on" lessons. Class will alternate grammar and conversation lessons, while adding a few practical cooking activities that will focus on recipes and traditions that characterize different geographical regions of Italy.
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FREN 1220 : Elementary French
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
FREN 1210-1220 is a two-semester sequence. This is the second half of the sequence designed to provide a thorough grounding in French language and an introduction to intercultural competence. French is used in contextualized, meaningful, and critical thinking activities to provide practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Development of analytical skills for grammar leads students toward greater autonomy as language learners. Students continue developing their writing skills by writing and editing compositions. Readings are varied and include literary texts and a short novel.  Daily preparations and active participation are required.
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PORT 1220 : Elementary Brazilian Portuguese II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
A full-year introductory course intended for students with no knowledge of Portuguese and with limited or no knowledge of Spanish. Emphasis is placed upon the development of the fundamental communication skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing.
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SPAN 1220 : Elementary Spanish II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
While building language proficiency and accuracy through communicative activities, the course encourages students to actively interact with one another. The instructor facilitates communication and provides feedback and language learning strategies that guide students to take responsibility of their own learning and become active participants in the process. The course also introduces students to the many peoples and cultures of the Spanish-speaking world, prompting them to make comparisons with their own culture. Additionally, lectures provide students with opportunities to reflect on relevant grammar topics and assist students in developing language learning strategies. Class discussions are conducted entirely in Spanish. After 1220, students may take SPAN 1230, SPAN 2070, or SPAN 2090 depending on their LPS score which is the final exam.
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FREN 1230 : Continuing French
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
FREN 1230 is an all-skills course designed to improve pronunciation, oral communication, and reading ability; to establish a groundwork for correct writing; and to provide a substantial grammar review. The approach in the course encourages the student to see the language within the context of its culture.
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FREN 1230 : Continuing French
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
FREN 1230 is an all-skills course designed to improve pronunciation, oral communication, and reading ability; to establish a groundwork for correct writing; and to provide a substantial grammar review. The approach in the course encourages the student to see the language within the context of its culture.
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SPAN 1230 : Continuing Spanish
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The goal of this low-intermediate course is to achieve a higher level of comprehension as well as to advance oral and written expression in a cultural context. Classes are in Spanish and the language is actively used in communicative and creative activities. Students engage in linguistic and literary analysis of texts to acquire new vocabulary, complete analytical exercises, and develop reading strategies. Students continue developing writing skills through composition, give oral presentations, and review grammatical structures independently with some clarification by the instructor as needed. After this course, students may take SPAN 2000, SPAN 2070, or SPAN 2090.
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SPAN 1230 : Continuing Spanish
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The goal of this low-intermediate course is to achieve a higher level of comprehension as well as to advance oral and written expression in a cultural context. Classes are in Spanish and the language is actively used in communicative and creative activities. Students engage in linguistic and literary analysis of texts to acquire new vocabulary, complete analytical exercises, and develop reading strategies. Students continue developing writing skills through composition, give oral presentations, and review grammatical structures independently with some clarification by the instructor as needed. After this course, students may take SPAN 2000, SPAN 2070, or SPAN 2090.
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ITAL 1401 : Intensive Elementary Italian
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An intensive elementary Italian language course. This 6-credit course covers material presented in ITAL 1201 and ITAL 1202 in just one semester. It's offered to students who cannot study Italian in the Fall, but can only do it in the Spring semester.
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SPAN 1501 : Strategies for Spanish Abroad
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This innovative course focuses on oral communication in Spanish for students who will do special projects abroad or short term study abroad trips.  Emphasis is placed on developing speaking and listening skills and strategies in a culturally relevant context.  It is intended for students with limited or no knowledge of Spanish and active class particippation is required.
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SPAN 2000 : Spanish for Heritage Speakers
Crosslisted as: LSP 2020 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Designed to expand bilingual Heritage students' knowledge of Spanish by providing them with ample opportunities to develop and improve each of the basic language skills, with a particular focus on writing vocabulary. The heritage student has at least one parent of Hispanic origin and grew up speaking Spanish at home; s/he also finished high school here in the US. After this course students may take SPAN 2140, SPAN 2150, SPAN 2170, or SPAN 2095.
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PORT 2010 : Intermediate Brazilian Portuguese for Spanish Speakers I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
PORT 2010-2020 is a full year course intended for students who have already taken the first level of Portuguese, or as an intensive introductory course for those who are native/near native speakers of Spanish.  An all-skills course with particular emphasis on Brazilian Portuguese spoken within the contexts of its culture, it presents a fast-paced review focused on improving grammatical accuracy, pronunciation and on enriching vocabulary.
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PORT 2010 : Intermediate Brazilian Portuguese for Spanish Speakers I
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
PORT 2010-2020 is a full year course intended for students who have already taken the first level of Portuguese, or as an intensive introductory course for those who are native/near native speakers of Spanish.  An all-skills course with particular emphasis on Brazilian Portuguese spoken within the contexts of its culture, it presents a fast-paced review focused on improving grammatical accuracy, pronunciation and on enriching vocabulary.
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PORT 2020 : Intermediate Brazilian Portuguese for Spanish Speakers II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Intended for students who have already taken the first level of Portuguese, or as an intensive introductory course for those who are native/near native speakers of Spanish.* An all-skills course with particular emphasis on Brazilian Portuguese spoken within the contexts of its culture, it presents a fast-paced review focused on improving grammatical accuracy, pronunciation and on enriching vocabulary.
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ROMS 2021 : Humans and Climate Change
Crosslisted as: COML 2021, EAS 2021 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores the human dimension of climate change, arguably the most significant crisis ever to confront humanity. The focus of this course will be narratives--the stories we tell ourselves as humans about the past, present and future in literature, film, art, science writing, design, and philosophy. We will address issues such as deep time; energy transitions; guilt and hope; justice and the future. No prior knowledge of atmospheric science or literary studies required. The course is open to anyone interested in thinking about the wicked problem that is climate change from various perspectives. Guest speakers and local field trips will enhance our perspectives.
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SPAN 2070 : Intermediate Spanish for the Medical and Health Professions
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Provides a conversational grammar review, with dialogues, debates, compositions, and authentic readings on health-related themes. Special attention is given to relevant cultural differences and how cultural notions may affect medical care and communication between doctor and patient. The objective of 2070 is to provide practice in real-life application, such as taking a medical history, calming a patient, and how to speak to a Hispanic patient in a culturally acceptable manner. After this course, a student may take SPAN 2140, SPAN 2150, SPAN 2170, or SPAN 2095.
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SPAN 2070 : Intermediate Spanish for the Medical and Health Professions
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Provides a conversational grammar review, with dialogues, debates, compositions, and authentic readings on health-related themes. Special attention is given to relevant cultural differences and how cultural notions may affect medical care and communication between doctor and patient. The objective of 2070 is to provide practice in real-life application, such as taking a medical history, calming a patient, and how to speak to a Hispanic patient in a culturally acceptable manner. After this course, a student may take SPAN 2140, SPAN 2150, SPAN 2170, or SPAN 2095.
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SPAN 2090 : Intermediate Spanish I (Composition and Conversation)
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This intermediate course develops accurate and idiomatic oral and written expression in a cultural context. Students achieve a higher level of syntactical and lexical competence through reading and discussing literary texts and viewing films. Particular emphasis is on writing and editing academic essays with peer/instructor feedback. Classes are in Spanish and the language is actively used in oral presentations and communicative, creative, and critical-thinking activities. Students review grammar structures on their own, with clarification and support of the instructor. After this course, students may take SPAN 2140, SPAN 2150, SPAN 2170, or SPAN 2095.
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SPAN 2090 : Intermediate Spanish I (Composition and Conversation)
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This intermediate course develops accurate and idiomatic oral and written expression in a cultural context. Students achieve a higher level of syntactical and lexical competence through reading and discussing literary texts and viewing films. Particular emphasis is on writing and editing academic essays with peer/instructor feedback. Classes are in Spanish and the language is actively used in oral presentations and communicative, creative, and critical-thinking activities. Students review grammar structures on their own, with clarification and support of the instructor. After this course, students may take SPAN 2140, SPAN 2150, SPAN 2170, or SPAN 2095.
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FREN 2090 : French Intermediate Composition and Conversation I
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This intermediate-level course is designed for students who want to focus on their speaking and writing skills. Emphasis is placed on strengthening of grammar skills, expansion of vocabulary and discourse levels to increase communicative fluency and accuracy. The course also provides continued reading and listening practice as well as development of effective language learning strategies.
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FREN 2090 : French Intermediate Composition and Conversation I
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This intermediate-level course is designed for students who want to focus on their speaking and writing skills. Emphasis is placed on strengthening of grammar skills, expansion of vocabulary and discourse levels to increase communicative fluency and accuracy. The course also provides continued reading and listening practice as well as development of effective language learning strategies.
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SPAN 2091 : Oral Practice for Study Abroad
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This one-credit course is focused on oral communication in Spanish; to take this course students must be concurrently enrolled in SPAN 2090.  Because the course is designed especially to encourage students to study abroad in Spain, it focuses on the colloquial use of Spanish in that country.
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FREN 2091 : Oral Practice for Study Abroad
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This one-credit course is focused on oral communication in French; to take this course students must be concurrently enrolled in FREN 2090.  Because the course is designed especially to encourage students to study abroad in France, it focuses on the colloquial use of French in that country.
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FREN 2091 : Oral Practice for Study Abroad
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This one-credit course is focused on oral communication in French; to take this course students must be concurrently enrolled in FREN 2090.  Because the course is designed especially to encourage students to study abroad in France, it focuses on the colloquial use of French in that country.
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FREN 2092 : Pronunciation of Standard French
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Reducing your foreign accent improves your ability to communicate in two ways: learning to distinguish and to produce clearly the full inventory of sounds in French increases both your ability to understand the spoken language and your ability to make yourself understood when speaking.  Because it distracts many listeners, a heavy foreign accent can prevent you from getting your message across even if you speak quite fluently.  This course focuses specifically on accent reduction and will interest anyone intending to use French in professional arenas such as international business, law, and project management, the import-export and hospitality industries, art restoration and curation, secondary and post-secondary teaching, or the perfoming arts.  By the end of the course students will achieve noticeably improved pronunciation, greater fluency, improved aural comprehension, and increased self-assurance in spoken French.
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SPAN 2095 : Spanish Intermediate Composition and Conversation II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This advanced-intermediate course is designed to prepare students for study abroad, entry into the major, and advanced-level courses. Students study stylistics, analyze and discuss texts, view films, and acquire advanced reading strategies. Continued emphasis is on writing and editing academic essays with peer and instructor feedback. Classes are in Spanish, and the language is actively used in oral presentations and communicative, creative, and critical-thinking activities. Students review grammar structures on their own, although the instructor may clarify as needed. The course is a pre-requisite for the major and may be taken concurrently with SPAN 2140, SPAN 2150, or SPAN 2170.
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SPAN 2095 : Spanish Intermediate Composition and Conversation II
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This advanced-intermediate course is designed to prepare students for study abroad, entry into the major, and advanced-level courses. Students study stylistics, analyze and discuss texts, view films, and acquire advanced reading strategies. Continued emphasis is on writing and editing academic essays with peer and instructor feedback. Classes are in Spanish, and the language is actively used in oral presentations and communicative, creative, and critical-thinking activities. Students review grammar structures on their own, although the instructor may clarify as needed. The course is a pre-requisite for the major and may be taken concurrently with SPAN 2140, SPAN 2150, or SPAN 2170.
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FREN 2095 : French Intermediate Composition and Conversation II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course emphasizes conversation based on short stories, poems, a play, a novel, cartoons, newspaper articles, short videos, and oral presentations by students. The goals of improving grammatical accuracy and enriching vocabulary in oral and written expression of French are achieved in a live setting during vigorous classroom discussions, as well as through written and oral analyses of the texts.  Compositions on student-selected topics and a detailed grammar review aid in reaching the goals.  Themes and emphases may vary from section to section.
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FREN 2095 : French Intermediate Composition and Conversation II
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course emphasizes conversation based on short stories, poems, a play, a novel, cartoons, newspaper articles, short videos, and oral presentations by students. The goals of improving grammatical accuracy and enriching vocabulary in oral and written expression of French are achieved in a live setting during vigorous classroom discussions, as well as through written and oral analyses of the texts.  Compositions on student-selected topics and a detailed grammar review aid in reaching the goals.  Themes and emphases may vary from section to section.
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ITAL 2110 : Italian Intermediate Composition and Conversation I in Rome
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This is an all-skills course designed to improve speaking and reading ability, establish a groundwork for correct writing, and provide a substantial grammar review.
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SPAN 2130 : Advanced Spoken Spanish
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This advanced course will focus on spoken Spanish in its formal and informal registers, regional dialects, and pronunciations.  Authentic texts from across different genres of film, newspapers, fiction, songs, and essays will be used to develop all skills with emphasis on oral production, as well as intercultural and pragmatic competence.  Students will further their fluency and accuracy by engaging in activities that might include debates, oral presentations, and interviews.
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ITAL 2130 : Italian Intermediate Composition and Conversation II in Rome
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course provides a review of composition, reading, pronunciation, and grammar review, as well as guided practice in conversation.  It emphasizes the development of accurate and idiomatic expression in the language.
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SPAN 2140 : Modern Spanish Survey
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Introductory survey of modern Spanish literature. Students develop their analytical skills and learn basic literary concepts such as genre (drama, lyric, short story, and novel) and style (romanticism, realism, etc.) as well as male/female perspectives and the translation of literature to film language. The survey introduces students to Spain's cultural complexity through readings of works by authors representative of its diverse linguistic and literary traditions.
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SPAN 2140 : Modern Spanish Survey
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Introductory survey of modern Spanish literature. Students develop their analytical skills and learn basic literary concepts such as genre (drama, lyric, short story, and novel) and style (romanticism, realism, etc.) as well as male/female perspectives and the translation of literature to film language. The survey introduces students to Spain's cultural complexity through readings of works by authors representative of its diverse linguistic and literary traditions.
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SPAN 2150 : Contemporary Latin American Survey
Crosslisted as: LATA 2150 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Readings and discussion of representative texts of the 19th and 20th centuries from various regions of Latin America. Among the authors considered are Sarmiento, Hernández, Martí, Darío, Agustini, Cortázar, García Márquez, Poniatowska, and Valenzuela.
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SPAN 2150 : Contemporary Latin American Survey
Crosslisted as: LATA 2150 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Readings and discussion of representative texts of the 19th and 20th centuries from various regions of Latin America. Among the authors considered are Sarmiento, Hernández, Martí, Darío, Agustini, Cortázar, García Márquez, Poniatowska, and Valenzuela.
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SPAN 2170 : Early Modern Iberian Survey
Crosslisted as: LATA 2170, MEDVL 2170 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course explores major texts and themes of the Hispanic tradition from the 11th to the 17th centuries. We will examine general questions on literary analysis and the relationship between literature and history around certain events, such as medieval multicultural Iberia, the creation of the Spanish Inquisition in the 15th century and the expulsion of the Jews in 1492; the encounter between the Old and the New Worlds; the 'opposition' of high and low in popular culture, and of the secular and the sacred in poetry and prose. Readings may be drawn from medieval short stories and miracle collections; chivalric romances, Columbus, Lazarillo de Tormes, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderón, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, among others.
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SPAN 2170 : Early Modern Iberian Survey
Crosslisted as: LATA 2170, MEDVL 2170 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores major texts and themes of the Hispanic tradition from the 11th to the 17th centuries. We will examine general questions on literary analysis and the relationship between literature and history around certain events, such as medieval multicultural Iberia, the creation of the Spanish Inquisition in the 15th century and the expulsion of the Jews in 1492; the encounter between the Old and the New Worlds; the 'opposition' of high and low in popular culture, and of the secular and the sacred in poetry and prose. Readings may be drawn from medieval short stories and miracle collections; chivalric romances, Columbus, Lazarillo de Tormes, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Calderón, and Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, among others.
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SPAN 2180 : Advanced Spanish Writing Workshop
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course, which is required for the major, is designed to help the learner develop increased accuracy and sophistication in writing in Spanish for academic purposes and continued oral practice in Spanish. To this end, there will be ample writing and revising practice, with a focus on specific grammatical and lexical areas, customized to the needs of the students enrolled in the course.
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SPAN 2180 : Advanced Spanish Writing Workshop
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course, which is required for the major, is designed to help the learner develop increased accuracy and sophistication in writing in Spanish for academic purposes and continued oral practice in Spanish. To this end, there will be ample writing and revising practice, with a focus on specific grammatical and lexical areas, customized to the needs of the students enrolled in the course.
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FREN 2180 : Advanced French
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course, furthering oral communication skills and writing skills is emphasized.  A comprehensive review of fundamental and advanced grammatical structures is integrated with short stories, literary excerpts, videos, poems, and articles from French magazines or newspapers, all chosen for thematic or cultural interest.  Students write weekly papers (essays and translations), have daily conversations focusing on the topics at hand, and give at last one presentation in class.
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FREN 2180 : Advanced French
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In this course, furthering oral communication skills and writing skills is emphasized.  A comprehensive review of fundamental and advanced grammatical structures is integrated with short stories, literary excerpts, videos, poems, and articles from French magazines or newspapers, all chosen for thematic or cultural interest.  Students write weekly papers (essays and translations), have daily conversations focusing on the topics at hand, and give at last one presentation in class.
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SPAN 2200 : Perspectives on Latin America
Crosslisted as: LATA 2200 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Interdisciplinary course offered every spring. Topics vary by semester, but readings always focus on current research in various disciplines and regions of Latin America. The range of issues addressed include the economic, social, cultural, and political trends and transitions in the area. In the weekly meetings, instructors and guest lecturers facilitate student discussions. Students taking the course are required to participate in all class discussions and write a research paper in their chosen focus area.
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ITAL 2201 : Italian III
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The goal of this course is development of all language skills at an intermediate level, with an emphasis on accurate, idiomatic, and culturally appropriate communication in Italian. Students will improve their language abilities through readings and other material related to common Italian cultural practices and daily life, guided compositions and other written assignments, directed conversation on topics relevant to understanding modern Italy.
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ITAL 2202 : Italian IV
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
An intermediate-level course that aims to further develop intercultural, reading, listening, speaking, and writing abilities in ITAL 2201. Students will be guided in perfecting their communication skills, improving their cultural proficiency, and developing a critical eye toward printed and visual material drawn from literature, history, politics, science, and arts in the Italophone world. Conversation skills will be practiced in daily discussions and in individual or group projects and presentations. A variety of written assignments will help students increase the range, accuracy, and stylistic appropriateness of their writing. Review of select grammar topics is part of this course, as is reading a short contemporary novel.
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ITAL 2203 : Languages/Literatures/Identities
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course, which is conducted in Italian and includes significant practice in grammar, vocabulary building, and composition, aims to foster reflection about the relationship among languages, literatures, and identities in Italy. Course Focus: Living together in a multicultural society.  Our principal reading will be Scontro di civiltà per un ascensore a piazza Vittorio, a 2006 award-winning novel by Algerian-Italian writer Amara Lakhous who came to Italy in 1995 as a political refugee; with this novel, he invites Italian readers to examine their 21st-century reality through the eyes of the immigrant.
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ITAL 2204 : The Cinematic Eye of Italy
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar introduces students to select masterworks of Italian postwar cinematography and familiarizes students with the vocabulary and the structures needed to analyze films and critique them.  We will examine the films' cultural and sociopolitical contexts as well as their formal aspects.
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SPAN 2230 : Perspectives on Spain
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
An introduction to Spain's history, plural cultures, and present-day society. Through a series of key literary works, films, and other visual representations we will explore such topics as the place of tradition, religion, and the family in modern Spain. Our focus will be on the transformation of Spain from an authoritarian state under General Franco's dictatorship (1939-1975) into a remarkably diverse and pluralistic nation in which linguistic, cultural, political, and gender differences have been consecrated in a very progressive legislation. This course satisfies the main requirement for the minor in Spanish, may be used as an elective for the major, and is crucial to those planning to study abroad in Spain in the near future.
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SPAN 2235 : Perspectives on Spain in Spanish
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course offers a broad introduction to Iberian cultures from the Middle Ages to the present.  Focusing on three main themes-space, culture, and everyday life-our main objective throughout the term will be to explore different perspectives unique to the ever-evoloving place we now call "Spain." The first half of the term will concentrate on aspects of space, culture, and everyday life in the medieval and early modern context, while the second half of the term will examine the same themes, questions, and concepts but from a modern and contemporary point of view using a wide variety of disciplines and media to explore them, from history, newspapers and music, to painting, film, and television.
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SPAN 2240 : Perspectives on the Caribbean
Crosslisted as: ASRC 2240, LATA 2240 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines the Caribbean as a site where challenges to and within Western thought emerged. We analyze the ways in which freedom is described in revolutionary thinking by interrogating the following themes in four sections. In the first section, we analyze the difficulties that 16th-century theologians experienced in determining if the "Indian" possessed a soul and if the Spanish crown could wage a "just war" against indigenous "pagans": this debate was crucial for the New World origins of disciples such as anthropology and international relations. In the second section, we examine the Haitian Revolution in order to describe and interrogate the philosophical and historical relations between master and slave. In the third section, we look at writings such as the Communist manifesto and Che Guevara' essays in order to analyze the difficulties of articulating the relationship between man and socialism in Cuba. In the final section, we examine the problems of designating who constitutes the native "we" and the foreign "them" in the neoliberal economic revolution that is taking place in Jamaica; for this discussion, we will read Jamaica Kincaid's A Small Place and view Stephanie Black's film, Life and Debt.
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FREN 2310 : Introduction to French and Francophone Literature and Culture
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course, designed to follow FREN 2095, introduces students to an array of literary and visual material from the French and Francophone world.  It aims to develop students' proficiency in critical writing and thinking, as well as presenting students with the vocabulary and tools of literary and visual analysis.  Each section of FREN 2310 will have a different focus-for example, colonialism and the other, or the importance of women and sexual minorities in French and Francophone history, performance in literature and film, or image and narrative-but all sections of FREN 2310 will emphasize through writing assignments and in-class discussions, the development of those linguistic and conceptual tools necessary for cultural and critical fluency.
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FREN 2310 : Introduction to French and Francophone Literature and Culture
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course, designed to follow FREN 2095, introduces students to an array of literary and visual material from the French and Francophone world.  It aims to develop students' proficiency in critical writing and thinking, as well as presenting students with the vocabulary and tools of literary and visual analysis.  Each section of FREN 2310 will have a different focus-for example, colonialism and the other, or the importance of women and sexual minorities in French and Francophone history, performance in literature and film, or image and narrative-but all sections of FREN 2310 will emphasize through writing assignments and in-class discussions, the development of those linguistic and conceptual tools necessary for cultural and critical fluency.
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SPAN 2330 : Latino Music in the US
Crosslisted as: AMST 2320, LSP 2320, MUSIC 2320 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Music and dance cultures have been central topics of study in the development of Chicano studies, Puerto Rican studies, and Latino studies in general. From Americo Paredes to Frances Aparicio and from Jose Limon to Deborah Pacini-Hernandez, focusing on music and embodied culture through sound has allowed scholars to engage the wide variety of cultural experiences of the different ethnic groups usually described with the term "Latino." Taking this scholarship as a point of departure, this class offers a survey of Latino music in the U.S. as a window into the political, cultural and social that struggles Mexicans, Cubans, Puerto Ricans, Brazilians, Colombians, and Central Americans have gone through while becoming hyphenated (Eg. Mexican-American, Cuban American, etc) or not, and into how these processes have continually challenged and enriched mainstream notions of "American identity."
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ITAL 2400 : The Italian-American Experience
Crosslisted as: AMST 2405 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Between 1880 and 1920, 4 million Italians moved to the United States in search of better fortunes. As a result, today there are 17 million US citizens of Italian descent, among them famed artists and celebrities such as Martin Scorsese, John Turturro, Madonna, and Lady Gaga.  Italian-Americans have left their mark on art, food, music, cinema, and television, creating a new vibrant culture. In this course, we will look at different cultural products that result from this cultural hybridity, chronicling the Italian-American journey from Ellis Island to show business.  The examined texts will include novels, memoirs and films, with particular emphasis on the work of female authors such as Helen Barolini, Kym Ragusa, and Louise de Salvo. Throughout the course, we will grapple with questions of gender and race, hybridity and identity, and we will explore the linguistic and visual strategies used by the authors to suggest a feeling of displacement.
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PORT 2800 : Perspectives on Brazil
Crosslisted as: LATA 2800 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course provides an introduction and overview of Brazilian culture. It will study different periods of Brazilian history, through the analysis of films, literature, essays, visual arts, and music. Students will explore different definitions of Brazilian identity and "Brazilianness" focusing on key topics including the formation of the colonial Brazil  and the emergence of the nation of Brazil as a tropical paradise; slavery and abolition; the particularities century; and the contradictions of the modernization process throughout the 20th century. We will consider elements of Brazilian popular culture such as Carnival, Samba, and "telenovels," and some of the most important cultural movements of the 20th century, such as "Modernismo," "Cinema Novo," and "Tropicalia." The primary objective of the course is to provide students with the relevant background to understand Brazilian cultural history.
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ITAL 2900 : Perspectives in Italian Culture
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This survey of modern Italian culture aims to acquaint students with the most important social, political and artistic developments occurring in Italian culture today. These include the effects of geographic and national fragmentation on political life in post-Risorgimento Italy; the "Southern Question" as it is known in Italy, especially the relation between southern regions like Sicily and Calabria and the North;  the phenomenon of "Cosa Nostra"; Italian contributions to world cinema in classics like "Rome Open City", "The Bicycle Thief", and more recently "Gomorrah"; Italian cooking and its relation to national identity; and Italy as a multi-ethnic territory. By providing students with a variety of cultural, political, and anthropological perspectives on Italian culture, students will get to see (and eat) for themselves how Italian culture is produced and consumed globally today.  Readings include selections from the works of Leonardo Sciascia and Carlo Levi and from film directors Roberto Rossellini, Vittorio de Sica, Sergio Leone, and Roberto Benigni.  A group of secondary readings will be used to complement our discussion of the current trends and issues facing contemporary Italy.
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ITAL 3010 : Screening Cosa Nostra: The Mafia and the Movies from Scarface to The Sopranos
Crosslisted as: PMA 3410 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
From Al Capone to Tony Soprano, the mafia has been the subject of numerous films over the course of 70 years, so many in fact that one might well speak of a "mafia obsession" in American popular culture. Drawing upon a large number of American and Italian films, this course examines the cultural history of the mafia through film. We will explore issues related to the figure of the gangster, the gender and class assumptions that underpin it, and the portrayal-almost always stereotypical-of Italian-American immigrant experience that emerges from our viewings. The aim will be to enhance our understanding of the role of mafia plays in American and Italian culture in the 20th and 21st centuries. Film screenings will include Little Caesar, Scarface, Shame of the Nation, The Godfather Parts I and II, Goodfellas, The Funeral, Donnie Brasco, episodes from The Sopranos, and Gomorrah.
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FREN 3160 : Translating French: Theory and Practice
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course, both seminar and workshop, students discuss writing about translation, mostly in French, and practice translating from French to English.  The theoretical texts studied represent a variety of perspectives and the French texts translated, a variety of literary and non-literary genres.  Students will investigate ways of addressing various types of difficulties they encounter in the process of translating across languages and cultures with the aim of developing their own principled approach to translating.
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SPAN 3170 : Creative Writing Workshop (in Spanish)
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Focuses on the practice of narrative writing in Spanish. Explores what makes a novel and a short story work, paying close attention to narrative structure, plot, beginnings/endings, character development, theme, etc. Students read classic novels and short stories as points of departure for the discussion. Because the course is a workshop, students are expected to write their own fiction.
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PORT 3200 : Advanced Portuguese II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
PORT 3210 : Reading Rio
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ROMS 3210 : History of Romance Languages
Crosslisted as: LING 3321 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
The Romance languages are the lasting imprint of all that happened to the Latin language as it moved through time, territories, and people of many ethnicities.  While the Latin of antiquity retained its prestige in high culture, the natural untutored usage of ordinary people was always free to go its own way.  This course covers the following topics, selected to create a panoramic view:  Formation of the general Romance seven-vowel system from Latin.  Early and widespread sound changes in popular Latin.  Finding and interpreting evidence for trends in popular Latin pronunciation.  The comparative method and its limitations.  Essential later sound changes, some of which ceate a whole new order of consonants unknown to Latin but conspicuous in Romance.  Nouns and adjectives from Latin to Romance.  Formation of the present indicative: the competing forces of sound change and analogical adjustment.  A brief overview of Portuguese.  Variants of the seven-vowel system.  Salient features of Romanian.  Factors that helped shape the vocabulary of Romance.  Medieval diglossia.  Emergence of Romance vernaculars newly recognized by their speakers as languages distinct from Latin and from each other.  Close analysis of the oldest surviving document written unmistakably in Romance (842 C. E.).
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FREN 3240 : French Classics
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FREN 3350 : Romance to Revolution: The French Novel Before 1850
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
In addition to considering formal questions relating to the development of the novel in French, this course examines problems such as the appearance of narrative and historical consciousness, the representation of woman, and the relation between literature and society. Texts include such major works as Tristan and Iseult, Perrault's Contes, Mme de LaFayette, Prevost, Rousseau, Diderot, Laclos, and Sade.
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FREN 3400 : French Identities: 21st Century Culture and Society in France
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is conceived as a critical introduction to a cultural and political debate that appeared in the years of Mitterrand's France and reached its climax in the last decade.  It will focus on a French society deeply shaped by immigration and globalization.  In which way do the youth of the "banlieue" - mostly formed by postcolonial Blacks and Muslims - create their own culture with the French culture?  How have literature, essays, movies, documentary films, "national identity" carried on by governments reacted to these transformations?  Selecting literary texts (by Maryse Condé, Zahia Rahmani, Adb El Malik) and other cultural productions, the course will explore the new expressions of France as an "imagined community".
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FREN 3460 : Intellectuals: A French History
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
SPAN 3470 : Nueva York: Caribbean Urbanisms
Crosslisted as: AMST 3475, ASRC 3470, LATA 3470, LSP 3470 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
To what extent is New York City part of the Caribbean? This course explores the ways in which writers from Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Dominican Republic write New York, whether as tourists, residents, or exiles. We will read about places like Coney Island, Wall Street, Chinatown, Harlem, the Bronx, the Village, the World Trade Center, and Washington Heights. Beginning with the chronicles of José Martí and other Cubans in the late 19th century, we then turn our attention to surrealist visions of catastrophe (1920s & 30s), followed by Nuyorico (1950s), Bronx hip hop (1970s), the gay underground scene (late 1970s & early 80s), 9/11, and the contemporary Dominican diaspora in Upper Manhattan. Topics include exile, nostalgia, transnationalism, imperialism, aesthetics, performance, race, and sexuality.   
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FREN 3485 : Cinematic Cities
Crosslisted as: COML 3485, ITAL 3485, SPAN 3485 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Beginning in the early days of silent cinema, a rich tradition of what are called "city films," combines technological innovation with the exploration of specific urban spaces.  Students in this class will learn how to think about the possibilities of limits of cinema as a way of "knowing" a city and its cultures, including linguistic cultures.  This course will be offered in English and is open to all students.  The focus will be on the relationship between the cinema and the development of urban centers, including Madrid, Rome, Paris, Barcelona, Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro, and Venice.  Films will be shown outside of regular class meeting times, in the original languages with English subtitles.
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FREN 3520 : (Dis)ability Studies: A Brief History
Crosslisted as: FGSS 3520 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will offer an historical overview of responses to bodily and cognitive difference.  What was the status of the monster, the freak, the abnormal, the (dis)abled, and how are all of these concepts related?  How have we moved from isolation and institutionalization towards universal design and accessibility as the dominant concepts relative to (dis)ability?  Why is this shift from focusing on individual difference as a negative attribute to reshaping our architectural and more broadly social constructions important for everyone?  What are our ethical responsibilities towards those we label as "disabled"?  Authors to be studied include: Ambroise Paré, Emmanuel Levinas, Georges Canguilhem, Michel Foucault, Lennard Davis, Tobin Siebers, Simon Baron-Cohen.
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ITAL 3580 : Creating Renaissance Man (and Woman)
Crosslisted as: FGSS 3588 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course is dedicated to studying important works of literature that address what it means, in the Renaissance, to strive for excellence as a man or as a woman, especially in the public sphere and in love.
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SPAN 3650 : The Spanish Civil War
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Spanish Civil War (1936-1939) and its aftermath is without doubt the most significant historical event in 20th century Spain. whose effects can still be felt in today's Spain.  From the moment of its outbreak, the war has been represented by a variegated and abundant number of cultural artifacts including photos, films, literary works, posters, memoirs, historical accounts.  In addition to studying the political, social, and cultural history of the civil war, this course will also focus on the interaction between aesthetics and politics, the relation between reality and its representation, as well as the ways in which we remember the past. We will consider a wide range of cultural materials produced during the war that includes photographs taken in Spain by foreign photographers such as Robert Capa or Kati Horna; propaganda posters and Picasso's "Gernika": poems by Pablo Neruda and Miguel Henanández; short stories by Max Aub.  We will also work on contemporary materials including fiction, film, photography, testimony in order reflect on the politics of memory and current debates surrounding the exhumation of mass graves.
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SPAN 3690 : Animals, Monsters, and Cyborgs
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this course we will explore how Latin American science fiction and fantastic novels, graphic novels, and short stories from the modern and contemporary period have represented the figures of the animal, the monster, and the cyborg.  The aim is to reflect on what these representations tell us about the shifting notions of race, gender,and ethnicity in the continent, and to analyze how these "weird" bodies are able to challenge binary constructions such as civilization/barbarism, nature/culture, human/animal, normal/abnormal. and body/mind, while creating spaces for emerging alternative communities.  Some of the authors to be read are Horacio Quiroga, Borges, H.G. Oesterheld, Angélica Gorodischer, Mario Bellatin, Giovanna Rivero, Bef, and Martín Felipe Castagnet.
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ROMS 3750 : Bohemians:Between Aesthetics and Politics
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In 1849, Théophile Gautier described Bohemianism as "love of art and hatred of the bourgeois."  For almost two centuries, between Montmartre in Paris and Greenwich Village in New York, passing through Munich, Vienna, Milan, and Buenos Aires, Bohemianism expressed an aesthetic and political revolt against the capitalist ethics of work, sexual conformism, repressive order, and the conventions of academic art.  Its representatives were young people whose precarious life took place in the margins of these great cities.  Artists, writers, and political conspirators were the heroes of this fragmented and highly unstable avant-garde.  This course will retrace the main steps of Bohemianism, from Murger and Courbet to Dada and surrealism, from The Masses to the Beatniks and the Punk movement of the 1970s.  Karl Marx,  André Breton, Walter Benjamin, John Reed, Claude Cahun, Hannah Arendt, Allen Ginsberg and other thinkers will help us to explore this vast intellectual and aesthetic landscape.
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SPAN 3800 : Poetry and Poetics of the Americas
Crosslisted as: AMST 3820, COML 3800, ENGL 3910, LATA 3800 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
As globalization draws the Americas ever closer together, reshaping our sense of a common and uncommon American culture, what claims might be made for a distinctive, diverse poetry and poetics of the America? How might we characterize its dominant forms and alternative practices? What shared influences, affiliations, concerns and approaches might we find and what differences emerge? Ranging across North and South America, Central America and the Caribbean, this course will place in conversation such figures as Poe, Stein, Eliot, Pound, Williams, Neruda, Vallejo, Borges, Parra, Césaire, Walcott, Bolaño, Espada, Waldrop, Vicuña, Hong, and Rankine.
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FREN 3840 : Occupied France Through Film
Crosslisted as: COML 3891 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The Second World War and the Occupation of France by German forces had a traumatic impact on the nation's identity.  We will examine the way France has tried to deal with this conflicted period through a series of films that each deal, directly or indirectly with the major questions posed by history to French "memory" of the Occupation.  What was the role of collaboration, resistance, anti-Semitism, of writers and intellectuals during this traumtic period?  How has film helped to define and re-shape the ways in which France has come to terms with its conflicted past?
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ROMS 3971 : Books Turned into Operas
Crosslisted as: COML 3971, ENGL 3713 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How and why is a book "translated" into an opera? We will study several such works and the operas they inspired: Mozart's Marriage of Figaro, Verdi's Rigoletto, Massenet's Werther, Giordano's Andrea Chénier, Holten's The Visit of the Royal Physician, and the movie A Royal Affair, a bridge between opera and novel. There will be opportunities for original historical research. What is so fascinating about the literary texts the operas (and the movie) draw on? It is partly their formal and linguistic qualities and partly their relation to history. Each of the literary works we study reflects the crisis of authority dating from the French Revolution; each of the operas in some way "manages" historical experience by creating aesthetic pleasure. We will see how.
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SPAN 4020 : Reading the Body in Medicine and Fiction
Crosslisted as: FGSS 4020 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course examines how modern Spanish writers and doctors represented the human body as they grappled with disease and disability.  Reading fiction alongside medical and anthropological texts we will examine notions of the normal/abnormal, beautiful/ugly/ and healthy/infected as they change over time.  We also look at the ways in which these concepts are inflected by other identity categories such as gender, race, sexuality, and class.
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FREN 4190 : Special Topics in French Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study of special topics.
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ITAL 4190 : Special Topics in Italian Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study of special topics.
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PORT 4190 : Special Topics in Brazilian Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study of specific topics. For undergraduates interested in special topics not covered in courses.
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SPAN 4190 : Special Topics in Spanish Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study of special topics. For undergraduates interested in special problems not covered in courses.
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FREN 4200 : Special Topics in French Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study of special topics.
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ITAL 4200 : Special Topics in Italian Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study of special topics.
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SPAN 4200 : Special Topics in Spanish Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study of special topics. For undergraduates interested in special problems not covered in courses.
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FREN 4230 : Revolution, Sexuality, Empire in Modern French Fictions
Crosslisted as: FREN 6230 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
ROMS 4260 : Historicizing Communism
Crosslisted as: FREN 4525, FREN 6525, HIST 4525, HIST 6525, ITAL 4520, ITAL 6520, ROMS 6525, SPAN 4525, SPAN 6525 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Communism merged multiple theories, events and experiences.  It's complexity does not lie exclusively in the discrepancies that separate the communist idea from its historical embodiments; it lies in the diversity of its expressions.  Sketching its "anatomy," this seminar will distinguish at least four broad forms of communism, interrelated and not necessarily opposed to one another, but different enugh to be recognized on their own: communism as revolution, communism as regime, communism as anti-colonialism and communism as a varient of social democracy.  The October Revolution was their common matrix, but their trajectories have been different.  Exploring communism as a global experience, we will shape the profile of one of the central actors of the twentieth century.
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ITAL 4290 : Honors in Italian Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Consult director of undergraduate studies for more information.
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FREN 4290 : Honors Work in French
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Consult director of undergraduate studies for more information.
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SPAN 4290 : Honors Work in Spanish
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Consult director of undergraduate studies for more information.
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FREN 4300 : Honors Work in French
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Consult director of undergraduate studies for more information.
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ITAL 4300 : Honors in Italian Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Consult director of undergraduate studies for more information.
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SPAN 4300 : Honors Work in Spanish
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Consult director of undergraduate studies for more information.
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SPAN 4370 : Fictions of Wonder: Variations of the Marvelous in Hispanic Literatures
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Visions, miracles, resurrections, the walking dead; ice, rumor, virtual lives, rabbits coming out of someone's mouth are all found in literatures from the Hispanic world.  This course explores variations of the marvelous in Hispanic cultures from the medieval to the modern, from miracles to magic realism and the "real maravilloso."  Poetry, short stories, novella and film (Debate del alma y del cuerpo, Milagros de Nuestra Señora, selections from Libro de Alexandre, Pedro Páramo, La invención de Morel, stories by Borges and Cortázar, and the films Como agua para chocolate, El amor en los tiempos del cólera) will be at the center of our inquiry, supported by critical readings and ample discussion.
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ROMS 4370 : The Holocaust and History Writing
Crosslisted as: FREN 4375, FREN 6375, GERST 4375, GERST 6375, HIST 4237, HIST 6237, ROMS 6370 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In the last decades, "Holocaust Studies" witnessed an extraordinary expansion, covering different fields of scholarship, from history to literature, from philosophy to aesthetics.  This seminar will retrace the major steps of Holocaust history writing.  It will analyze the classical debates between "intentionalism" and "functionalism," the discrepancies between the analytical approaches focused on the perpetrators and those focused on the victims, the inscription of the Holocaust into the broader context of war violence, and its comparison with the genocidal violence of colonialism.  Finally, it will investigate some methodological problems concerning the place of testimony in history writing and the permanent connections, both fruitful and problematic, between history and memory.  This means taking into account the entanglement of the most productive areas of Holocaust scholarship (Germany, France and the United States) as well as the relationship between the historiography of the Holocaust and other disciplines (memory studies, postcolonial studies, etc.).
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SPAN 4470 : Theory of the Novel
Crosslisted as: SPAN 6470 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FREN 4540 : Montaigne and Skepticism
Crosslisted as: FREN 6540 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How does philosophy respond to widespread and continuous disaster? The Wars of Religion in France and throughout Europe offer the context of continual violence, trauma, and social upheaval, and the Essais of Michel de Montaigne respond to this context by elaborating a new form of skepticism, based on classical models, which creates a space for more humane ethics (including some of the earliest discussions of religious and racial tolerance) and for freedom of thought (a relatively new concept in the Western World), by means of radical questioning of the functioning of political, religious, and intellectual authority. What Montaigne offers is both a practical and intellectual model for coping with extreme and omnipresent violence and social conflict, a model that presents difference as a necessary condition of physical and psychic survival. All texts will be in French.
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ROMS 4625 : Undocumentation
Crosslisted as: AMST 4620, COML 4616, FGSS 4620, LATA 4620, LSP 4621, SHUM 4620, VISST 4620 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In this seminar we will sustain a particular reading of post-1984 Mexico-US border cultural production as "undocumentation." Specifically, we will focus on performance, conceptual, and cinematic practices that corrupt the spreadsheet and the exposé; that reflect their makers' commitments to portraying extreme labor situations in a period of greater Mexican neoliberal transition now synonymous with NAFTA, culture and drug wars, and border militarization and maquilization. Assigned texts will include artwork by the Border Art Workshop and Elizabeth Sisco, Louis Hock, and David Avalos; writing by Gloria Anzaldúa, Guillermo Gómez-Peña, Sara Uribe, and Sergio González Rodríguez; contributions to the Tijuana-San Diego installation festival inSITE; and "undocumentaries" like Alex Rivera's Borders Trilogy, Sergio De La Torre and Vicki Funari's Maquilapolis, and Natalia Almada's El Velador.
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FREN 4690 : Romanticism in French
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course offers an introduction to Romanticism, as it develops in France and beyond, from the late 18th century to the early 1860s.  While the focus will be on literature, we will also consider other arts (especially painting and architecture) and see how the Romantic movement was also proposing a whole renovation of life, affecting the way nature, social relationships, or love could be experienced.  Because Romanticism was a "global" phenomenon, we will pay attention to the role played by voyages, exploration, and the circulation of ideas.  Studied authors will include major writers (such as Chateaubriand, Mme de Stael, Musset, Nerval, Hugo, or Baudelaire) and less famous figures, including Francophone authors from the Americas (Haiti or Louisiana, in particular).
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FREN 4712 : Women's Stories II
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The class is a continuation to reading and interpreting women's stories as they are  represented, written, at times erased before being recovered in French and Francophone history and cultures.  The course will analyze several figures/icons/images from the end of Old Regime to our time.  The goal of the course is to familiarize students with the analyses of different strategies and techniques of representation (esthetic, historical, scientific, autobiographical and fictional).  The corpus of works studied will include fictional and historical writing as well as paintings and films.  Examples of such case studies could include: Marie-Antoinette, Genmaine de Staël heroines of fairy tales, Camille Claudel, unknown women workers, or well known contemporary women authors such as Marguerite Duras, Marjane Satrapi, or Condé.
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FREN 4730 : Religious Violence In France
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor: Description
SPAN 4760 : Lorca's World: From Granada to New York
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FREN 4780 : Madness Narratives
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This seminar aims at studying the relationship between madness, alienation, creativity, and emancipation, by analyzing autobiographical narratives coming from both madmen and madwomen as well as writers. Originally used as study cases by psychiatrists during the second half of the nineteenth century, the status of testimonies on madness gradually changed until eventually they where recognized, notably by the surrealists, as literary works. At the same time, the success of many writers like Nerval, Maupassant, Proust, Gide, ad Leduc, among others, began to legitimize first person narratives that blurred the boundaries between fiction and autobiography, narrator and author, madness and creativity. Finally, in the twentieth century, in the wake of antipsychiatry, for many patients and survivors, these accounts of their own experience of madness became acts of resistance, a way to achieve their own recovery and emancipatory journey. In order to analyze these phenomena, this seminar will scrutinize different sources including, in addition to literary works, both movies and visual art productions.
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SPAN 4830 : 21st Century Latin American Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This course explores Latin American literature from the 60's onwards, taking a look at the changing landscape, from the heyday of the Boom writers and Garcia Marquez' "magical realism", to urban fiction in the nineties. We will study authors such as Garcia Marquez, Manuel Puig, Daimela Eltit, Roberto Bolaño, Alberto Fuguet, Mario Bellatin, and Mayra Santos-Febres.
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SPAN 4860 : Contemporary Poetry and Poetics
Crosslisted as: COML 4860, COML 6865, ENGL 4980, ENGL 6880, ROMS 6860 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What gives contemporary poetry and poetics its resonance and value? What are its dominant features, audiences, and purposes? What does 21st-century poetry's textual environment look like, and how does it situate itself among other genres, discourses, disciplines, media? How would we describe its ambient noise and how does that noise shape, inform, inflect its particular concerns and motivated forms? How does contemporary poetry resist, engage, respond to, sound out that noise? How are we to understand its relation to the pivotal cultural, economic, historical, philosophical, political developments of our time? This seminar will explore these and related questions in a wide range of works that open onto the rich interplay of contemporary poetry and poetics with questions of personal and collective identity and language in contexts at once local and global. Poets include Armantrout, Bernstein, Collins, Espada, Gander, Fitterman, Goldsmith, Hong, Osman, Place, Rich, Smith, and Waldrop.
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SPAN 4940 : Cuba:The Repeating Island
Crosslisted as: ASRC 4940, LATA 4940 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
As Cuba and the United States move forward toward normalizing diplomatic relations, this course seizes the opportunity to contextualize and analyze Cuba and cubanidad as sites and trajectories of repression and contestation.  Through literature, visual culture, music, and blogs, we interrogate and problematize prevalent dichotomous representations of the island as a space of fragmentation/uniformity, monotony/contingency, and persecution/liberation.  Divided into four sections, this course deconstructs the transition from 'Pseudo' Republic to Revolution (Carpentier, Castro, Che Fernández Retamar), sexual alterity as a mechanism of revolt (Pinera, Sarduy, Arenas), the genre of 'dirty realism' during the so-caled 'Special Period' of the 1990's (Gutiérrez, Ponte), and contemporary dissidence in post-Fidel 'New Cuba' (blogs, performance art, rap and punk music).  Theoretical readings (Benitzer Rojo) accompany primary texts and frame key ideas with respect to political subjectivity, biopolitics, and space.
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ROMS 5070 : Methodology of Romance Language Learning and Teaching
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Focuses on language teaching as facilitation of learning, thus on the learner's processing of language acquisition and the promotion of reflective teaching. Pedagogical approaches will be addressed from a learner-centered perspective involving effective language learning strategies and analysis.
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ROMS 5080 : Pedagogy Practicum
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This practicum is designed to better enable the TAs to meet the needs of their students in the understanding and acquisition of the linguistic forms, notions, and functions covered in their course.
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SPAN 6050 : Medieval Iberian Literatures
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This course will study Medieval Iberia as a site for cross-cultural exchange. We will look at Iberia in clusters of texts incorporating various disciplines, such as history, economics, law, literature, and architecture.  Students will prepare readings and will critically discuss them during the seminar sessions; the purpose is to arrive at a series of questions, hypotheses, proposals together during the entirety of the seminar. Primary texts in the original Castilian, texts from Latin, Arabic, Catalan, Galician-Portuguese and Hebrew will be read in either Spanish or English translation; secondary texts will be in English and Spanish.  The course will be conducted in Spanish.
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ROMS 6100 : Romance Studies Colloquium
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Designed to give insight into how to formulate projects, conduct research, and publish one's work, the colloquium offers a venue for faculty-graduate student dialogue in a collegial, intellectual setting.  Meetings are biweekly, 2-3 hours, and are open to all students and faculty in Romance Studies, but required for first year students in the program.  Each meeting, two faculty members will be invited to discuss their scholarship and also a short text of their choice, to be distributed beforehand.
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FREN 6190 : Poetics of Literary Reading
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
This research seminar offers an overall reassessment of literary reading, at the crossroads of philosophy and literary theory, with an additional interest in (cognitive) psychology.  The emphasis being on poetics, we will also examine how literary reflexive act and experience of reading.  The literary corpus of study will only include texts written in French, with no further a priori limitation in terms of era or area; it will be partially determined in concert with the students who are invited to discuss the oeuvres they focus on in their own research.  Open to both grads and advanced undergrads.
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FREN 6230 : Revolution, Sexuality, Empire in Modern French Fictions
Crosslisted as: FREN 4230 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor: Description
FREN 6300 : French Reading for Graduates
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Designed for those with little or no background in French. Aims primarily to develop skill in reading French. Covers grammar basics, extensive vocabulary, and strategies for reading in a foreign language. Some flexibility in selecting texts according to fields of interest.
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ROMS 6370 : The Holocaust and History Writing
Crosslisted as: FREN 4375, FREN 6375, GERST 4375, GERST 6375, HIST 4237, HIST 6237, ROMS 4370 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
In the last decades, "Holocaust Studies" witnessed an extraordinary expansion, covering different fields of scholarship, from history to literature, from philosophy to aesthetics.  This seminar will retrace the major steps of Holocaust history writing.  It will analyze the classical debates between "intentionalism" and "functionalism," the discrepancies between the analytical approaches focused on the perpetrators and those focused on the victims, the inscription of the Holocaust into the broader context of war violence, and its comparison with the genocidal violence of colonialism.  Finally, it will investigate some methodological problems concerning the place of testimony in history writing and the permanent connections, both fruitful and problematic, between history and memory.  This means taking into account the entanglement of the most productive areas of Holocaust scholarship (Germany, France and the United States) as well as the relationship between the historiography of the Holocaust and other disciplines (memory studies, postcolonial studies, etc.).
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SPAN 6390 : Special Topics in Spanish Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study of specific topics. For graduate students interested in special problems not covered in courses.
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ITAL 6390 : Special Topics in Italian Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study for graduate students.
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FREN 6390 : Special Topics in French Literature
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study for graduate students.
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PORT 6390 : Special Topics in Brazilian Literature - Grad
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study of specific topics. For graduate students interested in special topics not covered in courses.
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SPAN 6400 : Special Topics in Spanish Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study for graduate students. For graduates interested in special problems not covered in courses.
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ITAL 6400 : Special Topics in Italian Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study for graduate students.
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FREN 6400 : Special Topics in French Literature
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Guided independent study for graduate students.
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SPAN 6470 : Theory of the Novel: Modernity's Subjects
Crosslisted as: SPAN 4470 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Emerging in the wake of psychoanalysis, the theory of the novel is an effect of a new discourse on the subject within a modernity that sees itself as different and searches for a historical parallel.  Focused on four late medieval Iberian genres that explore different possibilities for prose fiction, this course will alternate the reading of primary texts (Amadis de Gaula, Cárcel de amor, La Diana, Lazarillo de Tormes) with selected readings from canonical theorists of the novel, especially those of relevance to Hispanic literary criticism, which may include Lukács, Guillén, Ortega y Gasset, Bakhtin, Jameson, Frye, Culler, Cascardi, Benjamin, Freud, Lévi-Strauss, assessing the possible consequences of this course's main hypothesis: that of the novel is simultaneously a theory of modernity and a theory of the subject.
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ITAL 6510 : Italian Thought
Crosslisted as: COML 6702 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
Deleuze and Guattari famously quipped that Italy lacked "a milieu" for philosophy, that its thinkers remained comets and that Italy had the habit of "burning" its comets. In this course we will not take issue so much with Deleuze and Guattari's evaluation as wonder if the period from the Italian 1968 to today might not in fact represent the elaboration of a "philosophical milieu" for Italian thought. As such the questions we will take up in this seminar concern the notion of milieu as a middle ground between philosophical extremes and subsequently, an investigation into what contemporary Italian political philosophers share.  Readings from Giorgio Agamben, Michael Hardt and Toni Negri, Roberto Esposito, Franco Berard ("Bifo"), Paolo Virno, Adriana Cavarero, Rosi Braidotti, as well as some works of a new generation of scholars will be discussed.
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ROMS 6525 : Historicizing Communism
Crosslisted as: FREN 4525, FREN 6525, HIST 4525, HIST 6525, ITAL 4520, ITAL 6520, ROMS 4260, SPAN 4525, SPAN 6525 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
Communism merged multiple theories, events and experiences.  It's complexity does not lie exclusively in the discrepancies that separate the communist idea from its historical embodiments; it lies in the diversity of its expressions.  Sketching its "anatomy," this seminar will distinguish at least four broad forms of communism, interrelated and not necessarily opposed to one another, but different enugh to be recognized on their own: communism as revolution, communism as regime, communism as anti-colonialism and communism as a varient of social democracy.  The October Revolution was their common matrix, but their trajectories have been different.  Exploring communism as a global experience, we will shape the profile of one of the central actors of the twentieth century.
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SPAN 6540 : Cervantes Mediterranean
Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
This seminar focuses on the Mediterranean in the age of Cervantes (1547-1616), a geographic and historical space envisioned by Braudel "not as a sea but as a succession of seas, not as a civilization but as a series of civilization superimposed one upon the other."  Characterized by its endless interactions and combats, continuity and rupture, the early modern Mediterranean was also distinquished by coexistence, cultural exchanges, and mediation among the men and women caught in those conflicts.  As a soldier and captive in the wars between the Habsburg and Ottoman empires, Cervantes left us a vital testimony of this tumultuous period.  We will explore the impact of his captivity in Algiers (1575-1580) in both his dramatic and novelistic production.  This traumatic experience constitutes a vortex or whirlwind in the nucleus of his great literary invention.  In a voyage that will take us from Algiers, in North Africa, to Sicily, Cyprus and Constantinople, we will study Cervantes's relations with Muslims and "renegades" -- Christian converts to Islam --, his representation of the shifting identities of these personages, as well as his depiction of the peoples, cultures, and religions that mutually contaminated and confronted each other across the Mediterranean.  The idea that survivors of traumatic events must tell their stories in order to continue living -- a concept derived from psychoanalysis -- explains in a compelling manner the profusion of stories by Cervantes that turn insistently around his Algerian captivity.  Our readings include plays and novellas by Cervantes, chronicles by Antonio de Sosa, and texts by Braudel, Cathy Caruth, J. Daklhia, Derrida, Lacan, Dori Laub, Primo Levi, Robert J. Lifton, and Jaime Monrique, among others.
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FREN 6540 : Montaigne and Skepticism
Crosslisted as: FREN 4540 Semester offered: Fall 2018 Instructor:
How does philosophy respond to widespread and continuous disaster? The Wars of Religion in France and throughout Europe offer the context of continual violence, trauma, and social upheaval, and the Essais of Michel de Montaigne respond to this context by elaborating a new form of skepticism, based on classical models, which creates a space for more humane ethics (including some of the earliest discussions of religious and racial tolerance) and for freedom of thought (a relatively new concept in the Western World), by means of radical questioning of the functioning of political, religious, and intellectual authority. What Montaigne offers is both a practical and intellectual model for coping with extreme and omnipresent violence and social conflict, a model that presents difference as a necessary condition of physical and psychic survival.
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ROMS 6860 : Contemporary Poetry and Poetics
Crosslisted as: COML 4860, COML 6865, ENGL 4980, ENGL 6880, SPAN 4860 Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
What gives contemporary poetry and poetics its resonance and value? What are its dominant features, audiences, and purposes? What does 21st-century poetry's environment look like, and how does it situate itself among other genres, discourses, disciplines, media? How would we describe its ambient noise and how does that noise shape, inform, inflect its particular concerns and motivated forms? How are we to understand its relation to the pivotal developments of our time? This seminar will explore these and related questions in a range of works from the past two decades that open onto the rich interplay of contemporary poetry and poetics with questions especially of language, aesthetics, and politics. 
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SPAN 6940 : Latin American 20th Century Novels
Semester offered: Spring 2018 Instructor:
The objective of this course is to explore the most important trends in Latin American novels of the twentieth century, in light of the cultural, political, and social changes which took place in the continent.  We will analyze topics such as regionalism, transculturation, and the emergence of magical realism in Latin American fiction; we will discuss the Boom and the post-Boom relationship between mass media/new technologies and writing: we will also explore writing about violence, and the relationship with the traumatic past in novels of the civil war and the dictatorships.  We will tackle the continuous importance of popular genres (the fantastic, horror, sciencie fiction).  We will read authors such as José Eustasio Rivera, Nellie Campobello, Alejo Carpentier, Mario Vargas Llosa, Gabriel Garcia Márquez, Clarice Lispector, Ricardo Piglia, Roberto Bolano, etc.
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